IC693PRG300

GE-IP | 9030 | GE Fanuc 90-30 GE-IP PLC

IC693PRG300 Image

IC693PRG300

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  • Manufacturer: GE-IP
  • Description: 90-30 Hand Held Programmer
  • Weight: 1 lbs :: ≈ 1 kgs
  • Warranty: 1 Years
  • Product Revisions Available:
  • Other Available Revisions of the IC693PRG300 : A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z,

Product Manual Excerpt

The major features of the Hand-Held Programmer (catalog number IC693PRG300) for the Series 90-30, 90-20 and Micro Programmable Logic Controllers include: Creating a Statement List program, including insert, edit and delete functions. Making on-line program changes. Searching a logic program for instructions and/or machine references. Performing optional dual use checking of discrete output references when instructions are entered. Monitoring reference data or I/O point status while viewing the logic program. Monitoring reference data in table form in binary, hexadecimal, or decimal format. Monitoring register reference data in timer/counter format. Making on-line reference data changes. Four PLC access privilege levels Using the OEM protection key. Configuring I/O modules. Viewing PLC scan time, firmware revision code, and current logic memory usage. Loading, storing, and verifying program logic and configuration from/to/with the Series 90 Memory Card or EEPROM. Starting or stopping the PLC from any mode of operation. Keypad The keypad on the Hand-Held Programmer consists of 42 keys, arranged as a matrix of six keys across by seven keys down. The keypad is color-coded for easier identification of the different keys. Becoming familiar with the programmer keys and their functions will increase your programming efficiency. Some of the keys have multiple uses, depending on the current operating mode and function. A description of the valid keys and their usage is included in chapter 2, Operation, and also in the beginning of each chapter of this manual. 1 1-2 Hand-Held Programmer for Series 90-30/20/Micro Programmable Controllers User s Manual February 1996 GFK-0402G LCD Screen Information is displayed on an LCD screen which is two lines by sixteen characters in size. The contents of the screen depends on the current operating mode and function. The intensity of the screen can be increased or decreased by inserting a Phillips-head screwdriver into the small square opening on the right side of the programmer and turning it to the right or left, accordingly. PLC Communications The Hand-Held Programmer communicates with an attached PLC through an RS-422 compatible port. The cable connection supplies power to the Hand-Held Programmer and indicates to the PLC that a Hand-Held Programmer is attached. Please refer to chapter 2, Operation, for cable connection information. Memor y Card Interface An interface to a removable memory card is provided. This removable memory card is a Series 90 Memory Card (catalog number IC693ACC303). The interface is used for storage and/or retrieval of program logic and configuration data. Detailed information on using the memory card to read, write, and verify data can be found in chapter 2. Operating Modes The Hand-Held Programmer supports four major operating modes: Mode 1. Program Mode: Program mode is used to create, alter, monitor, and debug Statement List (SL) logic programs. Interaction (Read, Write, and Verify) with a Series 90 Memory Card or EEPROM is also possible in program mode. Please refer to chapter 5, Program Edit, for additional information on using program mode. Mode 2. Data Mode: Data mode enables you to view and alter values in various reference tables. Numerous display formats are also supported. Please refer to chapter 6, Reference Tables, for additional information on using data mode. Mode 3. Protection Mode: Protection mode enables you to control access to (protect) a programmable logic controller, including program logic, reference data, and configuration information. The use of this mode is optional. Additional information on protection mode can be found in chapter 7, PLC Control and Status. Mode 4. Configuration Mode: In configuration mode, you can define the makeup of I/O modules in the PLC, including both those I/O modules already installed as well as those to be installed at a later time. Additional information on configuration mode can be found in chapter 3, PLC Configuration, and chapter 4, I/O Configuration. 1 GFK-0402G Chapter 1 Introduction to the Hand-Held Programmer 1-3 Several functions may be performed independent of the current mode of operation. These functions include mode selection and starting or stopping the PLC. Please refer to chapter 7, PLC Control and Status. References The data used in an application program is stored as either register or discrete references. When entering a statement list program you must assign references to data in the PLC system. A reference specifies both a memory type and a precise location within that memory type. For example: %I0001 specifies address 1 in discrete input memory and %R0256 specifies address 256 in register memory. The %I symbol is used by the PLC to distinguish machine references from nicknames (the % symbol is not entered or displayed on the HHP). The valid register and discrete references that are used with the Series 90-30 and Series 90-20 programmable logic controllers are described in the following two tables. Table 1-1. Register References Type Description %R The prefix %R is used to assign system register references, which will store program data such as the results of calculations. %AI The prefix %AI represents an analog input register. This prefix is followed by the register address of the reference (for example, %AI0015). An analog input register holds the value of one analog input or other value. %AQ The prefix %AQ represents an analog output register. This prefix is followed by the register address of the reference (for example, %AQ0056). An analog output register holds the value of one analog output or other value. Note All register references are retained across a power cycle to the CPU. 1 1-4 Hand-Held Programmer for Series 90-30/20/Micro Programmable Controllers User s Manual February 1996 GFK-0402G Table 1-2. Discrete References Type Description %I The %I prefix represents input references. This prefix is followed by the reference s address in the input table (for example, %I0121). %I references are located in the input status table, which stores the state of all inputs received from input modules during the last input scan. A reference address is assigned to discrete input modules using the Logicmaster 90-30/90-20 configuration software or the Hand-Held Programmer. Until a reference address is assigned, no data will be received from the module. %Q The %Q prefix represents physical output references. The dual use coil checking function of the HHP checks for multiple uses of %Q references with relay coils or outputs on functions. Beginning with Release 3 of Series 90-30 and Release 2 of Series 90-20 firmware, you can select the level of coil checking desired (SINGLE, WARN MULTIPLE, or MULTIPLE). Refer to Chapter 3 for more information about this feature. The %Q prefix is followed by the reference s address in the output table (for example, %Q0016). %Q references are located in the output status table, which stores the state of the output references as last set by the application program. This output status table s values are sent to output modules at the end of the program scan. A reference address is assigned to discrete output modules using the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro configuration software or the Hand-Held Programmer. Until a reference address is assigned, no data is sent to the module. A particular %Q reference may be either retentive or non-retentive. %M The %M prefix represents internal references. The dual use coil checking function of the HHP software checks for multiple uses of %M references with relay coils or outputs on functions. Beginning with Release 3 of Series 90-30 and Release 2 of Series 90-20 firmware, you can select the level of coil checking desired (SINGLE, WARN MULTIPLE, or MULTIPLE). Refer to Chapter 3 for more information about this feature. A particular %M reference may be either retentive or non-retentive. %T The %T prefix represents temporary references. These references are never checked for multiple coil use and can, therefore, be used many times in the same program even when coil use checking is enabled. Because this memory is intended for temporary use, it is never retained through power loss or RUN-to-STOP-to-RUN transitions and cannot be used with retentive coils. %S The %S prefix represents system status references. These references are used to access special PLC data, such as timers, scan information, and fault information. System references include %S, %SA, %SB, and %SC references. %S, %SA, %SB, and %SC can be used on any contacts. %SA, %SB, and %SC can be used on retentive coils -(M)-. %S can be used as a word or bit-string input reference to functions or function blocks. %SA, %SB, and %SC can be used as a word or bit-string input or output reference to functions and function blocks . %G The %G prefix represents global data references. These references are used to access data shared among several PLCs. %G references can be used on contacts and retentive coils because %G memory is always retentive. %G cannot be used on non-retentive coils. Transitions and Overrides The %I, %Q, %M, and %G user references have associated transition and override bits. %T, %S, %SA, %SB, and %SC references have transition bits, but not override bits. The CPU uses transition bits for counters and transitional coils. Note that counters do not use the same kind of transition bits as coils. Transition bits for counters are stored within the locating reference. 1 GFK-0402G Chapter 1 Introduction to the Hand-Held Programmer 1-5 In the Series 90-30 model 331, 340, 341, and 351 CPU, override bits can be set. When override bits are set, the associated references cannot be changed from the program or the input device; they can only be changed on command from the programmer. Neither the Series 90-30 model 311 or 313 CPU nor the Series 90-20 model 211 CPU supports overriding discrete references. Retentiveness of Data Data is said to be retentive if it is saved by the PLC when the PLC is stopped. Unless otherwise stated for a particular model of CPU, the Series 90 PLCs preserve program logic, fault tables and diagnostics, overrides and output forces, word data (%R, %AI, %AQ), bit data (%I, %S (%SC is retentive: not %SA or %SB), %G, fault bits and reserved bits), %Q and %M data (unless used with non-retentive coils), and word data stored in %Q and %M. %T data is not saved. %Q and %M references are non-retentive (that is, cleared at power-up when the PLC switches from STOP to RUN) whenever they are used with non-retentive coils. Non-retentive coils include coils -( )-, negated coils -( / )-, SET coils -( S )-, and RESET coils -( R )-. When %Q or %M references are used with retentive coils, or are used as function block outputs, the contents are retained through power loss and RUN-to-STOP-to-RUN transitions. Retentive coils include retentive coils -( M )-, negated retentive coils -(/M)-, retentive SET coils -(SM)-, and retentive RESET coils -(RM)-. The last use of a %Q or %M reference on a coil instruction determines its retentive state.